School of Integrative Studies
College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Courses and Syllabi

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Integrative Studies (INTS - Formerly NCLC) Spring 2017

Undergraduate

100-Level Courses in INTS

INTS 101: Narratives of Identity (6 Credits)

Explores the concept of identity through the study of literature and oral communication. Introduces aesthetic, cultural, and historical aspects of these forms of communication as well as their psychological, political, and practical significance, with special emphasis on the role of communication in a free society.

INTS 102: Global Networks and Communities (6 Credits)

Prepares students for participation in a global society by investigating global and local issues in a historical context. Considers critical topics of western civilization, globalization, (neo)colonialism, imperialism, and hegemony. Students gain an in-depth perspective of the intricate relationships between people and cultures at various moments in our history. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 103: Human Creativity: Science and Art (6 Credits)

Investigates the vital role played by human creativity in fine arts and natural sciences. Fosters an understanding of the aesthetic and intellectual components of the arts while exploring the scientific method, the relation of theory and experiment, and the development and elaboration of major ideas in science. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 165: Independent Study (1-12 Credits)

Individualized section form required. Study of a topic not otherwise available to the student. May involve any combination of reading assignments, tutorials, lectures, papers, presentations, or field/laboratory study (determined in consultation with instructor). Students are encouraged to work as a team on a particular topic.

INTS 194: Service-Learning Experience (1-15 Credits)

Service-learning courses offer students, faculty, and community partners an opportunity to work together to integrate and apply knowledge to address community needs. Learning goals, action strategies, and assignments developed collaboratively. Students demonstrate progress through critical reflection that illustrates growth in acquiring and comprehending values, skills, and knowledge content. Critical reflection may take the form of papers, presentations, portfolios, journals, and exams.

INTS 195: Field-Based Work (1-6 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

200-Level Courses in INTS

INTS 200: Visual Thinking and the Creativity (3-15 Credits)

Investigates modes of visual and textual creativity through art, literature, and variety of visual and textual forms. Through interdisciplinary approach to picturing text, provides opportunity to experiment with creative composition that includes visual elements, and with art forms that include textual elements. Explores blocks to creativity, and provides understanding of how to evaluate and write about visual texts as well as how to produce documents that integrate words and images.

INTS 201: The World Since 1945 (6 Credits)

Examines the history of the past 50 years to illuminate the contemporary world as well as build connections between the global and local. Using historical works, fiction, autobiographies, films, and daily newspapers, students explore such major events as the Cold War, the struggle against apartheid in South Africa, the Vietnam War, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and the continuing conflict in the Middle East. As a learning community, requires active student participation in group projects and discussions.

INTS 202: Public Speaking and Critical Thinking Skills (4 Credits)

Combines process of learning to speak in front of audiences with analysis of arguments and persuasive appeals. Students learn how to create and present effective speeches, adapt messages to specific audiences, and evaluate and critique messages produced for others. One credit of experiential learning enables students to examine public speeches, news stories, political campaigns, and advertising, among others, to make meaningful connections between public speaking theory and practice.

INTS 203: Inquiry for Action: Facilitating Change (6 Credits)

Examines the relationships between academic research, individual acts and society's social and political structures. Students design a community-based research project, explore a rich array of qualitative and quantitative approaches, apply information and communication technologies to all aspects of the research process, and learn from individuals and organizations outside the classroom.

INTS 204: Leadership Theory and Practice (3 Credits)

Examines historical and contemporary leadership theories and invites students to be reflective of their own leadership experiences through the lenses of those theories. Students develop critical lenses through which to evaluate their own self-awareness, effectiveness in groups, and ability to navigate structures and systems.

INTS 210: Sustainable World (4 Credits)

Covers basic issues in the natural and social sciences that underlie current environmental problems. Considers ethical matters such as equity as they pertain to global resource consumption, pollution, and climate change. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 211: Introduction to Conservation Studies (3-6 Credits)

Provides foundation for the integrative study of environmental conservation. Formal and informal writing assignments and oral presentations designed to strengthen critical thinking and communication skills important to students who pursue conservation-related professions. Instructors encourage students to use course assignments and off-campus work to identify suitable educational and career paths within the conservation world. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 231: Introduction to Community Studies (4 Credits)

Examines relationship between sustainable communities and democratic citizenship in a diverse society. The objectives are to improve one's understanding of and thinking critically about communities and democratic principles, theories and practice. Students identify and work through problems that communities address by working in a community service-learning setting.

INTS 244: Beats, Rhyme, and Culture (4 Credits)

Examines the history of hip-hop and the effect it has had on our society. The primary focus is to consider hip-hop as a medium of communication that impacts, represents, and misrepresents the life experiences of youth in the United States. Students are exposed to historical, socioeconomic, and musical/aesthetic contexts of this genre through in-class activities and by attending related cultural events.

INTS 245: Visual Culture and Society (4 Credits)

Explores the role of visual culture in contemporary society including an examination of photography, the visual and performing arts, film and video, and electronic media. Readings focus on the historical foundations of visuality as well as theories of visual culture and aesthetics. Students investigate the ways that forms of visual culture function in society and how these are linked to race, class, and gender as well as politics and economics. Students will gain hands-on experience working with contemporary visual media tools such as computer graphics and digital video editing.

INTS 249: Digital Literacy (4 Credits)

Investigates information literacy, the mobile web, and interactive and immersive media, including gaming, social networking, blogging and micro-blogging, intellectual, political and civic collaborations, digital aesthetics and emerging digital cultures and art forms.Ê Explores major theories of digital literacy and culture and introduce diverse social, artistic, theoretical and cultural practices that characterize today's digital domains and virtual environments. Ê

INTS 275: Special Topics (1-18 Credits)

Studies topics of special interest to undergraduates.

INTS 290: Internship (1-6 Credits)

Internship credit may be applied to 12 credits required in experiential learning.

INTS 294: Service-Learning Experience (1-15 Credits)

Service-learning courses offer students, faculty, and community partners an opportunity to work together to integrate and apply knowledge to address community needs. Learning goals, action strategies, and assignments developed collaboratively. Students demonstrate progress through critical reflection that illustrates growth in acquiring and comprehending values, skills, and knowledge content. Critical reflection may take the form of papers, presentations, portfolios, journals, and exams.

INTS 295: Field-Based Work (1-18 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

INTS 298: Field-Based Work (1-15 Credits)

Experiential-based individualized studies, mentored by instructor.

300-Level Courses in INTS

INTS 300: Law and Justice (3 Credits)

Combines various teaching methods including lectures, the Socratic method, case studies, discussion of readings and films, debates, and active inquiry-based learning to investigate the major institutions in the American legal system.

INTS 301: Science in the News (3 Credits)

Examination and discussion of the current trends in science as reported in the popular media. Students learn how to evaluate the science that is reported so they may become informed consumers; discuss how scientific advancement might shape society by looking at how science and society have changed together over time; and use examples from the past to discuss future trends.

INTS 302: Argument and Advocacy (6 Credits)

Develops theoretical background and skills necessary for effective civic engagement and deliberative discourse. Teaches fundamentals of argument construction, function, and analysis. Covers role of argument and advocacy in a democratic society.

INTS 303: Introduction to International Studies (3 Credits)

Explores a multi-disciplinary approach to addressing world issues. Combines lectures, field trips, discussion of readings, films, case studies, projects, and active inquiry-based learning to examine the natural environment, infectious disease and globalization, media and technologies, and war and violent conflict, with an attempt to deepen community members' understanding of an increasingly interdependent world.

INTS 304: Social Movements and Community Activism (4 Credits)

Examines how citizens, individually and collectively, accomplish social change in society through case study analysis. Considers advantages and limits of social change strategies from communication and social movement theory perspectives. Surveys topics including how leaders maintain momentum in face of opposition; how movements and organizations use slogans, symbols and music to inspire followers; and how participants construct persuasive media campaigns and political arguments to facilitate policy change.

INTS 305: Conflict Resolution and Transformation (6 Credits)

Examines the nature and dynamics of conflict and ways to resolve and transform conflict. Experiential learning is used as the vehicle through which students explore their assumptions about communication and develop their skills for resolving interpersonal conflicts.

INTS 308: American Landscapes in Fiction, Film, and History (6 Credits)

Waterways and roadways have always had practical, spiritual significance for Americans. Course looks at American literary works and films in historical context to better understand the roles roads, rivers play in shaping physical, cultural landscape of United States. Students explore course themes outside classroom on weekend field trips, and conduct self-directed road trip as a main learning events.

INTS 310: Violence and Gender (3-6 Credits)

Using nonfiction, research documentaries, oral histories, case studies, literature, feature films, music, dance, and visual arts, examines the dynamics of violence through different cultural lenses. Students work in university and community settings to integrate their academic experiences with practice.

INTS 311: The Mysteries of Migration: Consequences for Conservation (6 Credits)

Investigates the biology of migration and its implications for science policy. Students consider the phenomenon of migration in the context of natural history, conservation, and cultural issues. The course includes several weekend trips for field study. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 312: Images and Experiences of Childhood: Social Construct, Literature, and Film (3-6 Credits)

Immerses students in the images of childhood through the media of literature, video, and poetry, with a strong emphasis on historical perspectives of childhood. The class is interactive, requires some work in groups, and requires classroom participation.

INTS 314: Conflict, Trauma and Healing (6 Credits)

Develops in students an appreciation of human resilience and helps them acquire better coping mechanisms. Imparts knowledge of the nature and dynamics of trauma and healing. Investigates the difficulties people face in responding to settings of conflict such as war, school shootings, abuse, domestic violence, including natural disaster. Examines case studies from a variety of personal, national, and international settings.

INTS 315: Spirituality and Conflict Transformation (6 Credits)

Examines dimensions of spirituality, including peacemaking efforts in large-scale conflicts, conflicts within faith communities, and interpersonal disputes. Experiential learning explores spiritually informed resolution.

INTS 316: Introduction to Childhood Studies (4 Credits)

Focuses on the study of childhood from birth to adolescence from the perspective of several disciplines. Covers childhood theory, research, and policy and their applications to decisions regarding children and youth.

INTS 317: Issues in Family Relationships (4 Credits)

Dynamics of family systems and issues that shape relationships among family members. How families evolve as members grow, leave, and create related family systems; family roles and forms; and communication patterns, decision- making, conflict, stress, and power. Content draws from family communication, family relations, psychology, and counseling. Lecture, discussion, observation, analysis, research, and role-playing.

INTS 318: Exploring Virginia's Watersheds (4 Credits)

Comprehensive overview of history, geography, economics, and management of water resources in Virginia; and how rapidly growing population has measurably degraded resource. Includes one weekend field trip. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 319: Contemporary Youth Studies (3 Credits)

Examines the history of positive youth development, how scholars study youth, and the theories they use to guide their research. Evaluates the policies and programs aimed at empowering youth.

INTS 320: Construction of Differences: Race, Class, and Gender (6 Credits)

Investigates race, sex, sexual orientation, and social class in contemporary American society. Examines commonalities in the construction of these categories and experiences of those who occupy them.

INTS 321: Parent-Child Relations (3 Credits)

Introduces students to concepts and challenges in parenting, along with family diversity and risk factors. Considers interactions between parents and children from birth to adolescence as well as cross-cultural, historical, and societal influences. Explores efforts that have been successful in changing detrimental parenting actions.

INTS 322: Teacher: A Historical Perspective (3 Credits)

Examines the rich heritage of the teaching profession in Western society. Traces the history of educational philosophy and teaching, beginning with the ancient Greeks and culminating in the 21st century United States. Using the exploration of the various philosophies of education as a foundation, examines contemporary images of teachers in literature and film.

INTS 331: The Nonprofit Sector (4 Credits)

Readings, classroom discussions and activities, and practical experience reveal historical, legal, and socioeconomic forces that define and influence the American nonprofit sector. Explores structures, issues that affect nonprofit management, governing, and financial systems.

INTS 333: The Nature of Mathematics (3 Credits)

Include theoretical framework, historical context, connections with some other disciplines, and current issues. Selected mathematics topics such as advanced algebra and geometry and introductions to set theory, probability, calculus, and number theory.

INTS 334: Environmental Justice (4 Credits)

Examines historical and contemporary sociopolitical and socioeconomic conditions that have given rise to the environmental justice movement. Analyzes how individuals contribute to environmental justice or injustice through everyday decisions. Considers how environmental justice movement responds to these issues. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 335: Ethics, Communication, and Freedom (3-6 Credits)

Students examine ethical principles, discuss some underlying bases for these principles, and work to understand how such principles are experienced and can be applied in a free society. Focus is on examining potential conflicts between ethics and the freedoms believed essential to a healthy democratic society. Cases drawn from sports, medicine, media, politics, and business.

INTS 336: Poverty, Wealth and Inequality in the US (3 Credits)

Explores the social, cultural, political, and spiritual implications of poverty, wealth, and inequality in the United States. Examines the ways in which class identity informs one's views of the world and its politics; how socioeconomic status affects one's access to education and other social goods; and how dominant discourses and stereotypes related to poverty influence mass perception regarding a range of social issues, from educational policy to welfare.

INTS 337: Social Justice Consciousness and Personal Transformation (3 Credits)

Explores the many spaces at which the quest to strengthen social justice consciousness interacts with processes and commitments for personal transformation. Analyzes through the lens of the activist and in the spirit of bringing mindfulness to activism, how we come to see and experience the world. Examines how socialization informs consciousness.

INTS 338: Animal Rights and Humane Education (3 Credits)

Explores a combination of critical theories, experiential learning, and dialogical practices to examine the ways in which non-human animals are exploited for human profit. Examines the ramifications of this exploitation ecologically, as a question of sustainability, and spiritually, as a question of the impact of animal abuse on the human spirit. Discusses the use of animals in entertainment, factory farming, animal testing, and sport or trophy hunting; and how individuals and organizations are fighting these practices. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 345: Introduction to Multimedia (5 Credits)

Technological, aesthetic, and educational issues of using interactive multimedia. Topics include theoretical underpinnings of some technological issues involved in multimedia computing as well as techniques for authoring interactive multimedia projects using a variety of digital media tools.

INTS 346: Art as Social Action (4 Credits)

This learning community explores historical records to understand different ways art has been produced, distributed, and consumed. Examines ways artists have affected change in their worlds. Through interdisciplinary studies, teaches major social movements and artists and theories used in socially engaged art. Students engage in experiential learning outside classroom as course requirement.

INTS 347: Gender Representation in Popular Culture (3-6 Credits)

Explores the way in which masculinity and femininity have been represented across the decades in television, movies, music videos, pop art, and print media. Provides a review of the scholarship on the historical and contemporary roles of women and men in society, and examines the contradictions and expectations associated with gender roles. Incorporates active group learning through creative, insight-oriented exercises, critical thinking and discussions, and group presentations and media research activities.

INTS 348: Digital Futures (3-6 Credits)

Investigates important contemporary issues such as surveillance-privacy, censorship, piracy, gender and ethnicity, digital labor and play, mobile media and globalization, and the commercialization and political potential of the digital public spheres. Introduces students to the latest technological, philosophical and creative thinking on the future of human society in a digital age.

INTS 355: Consciousness, Meaning and Life Purpose (3 Credits)

Examines scientific evidence about states of consciousness, providing opportunities for experiences and reflections about the personal impact of states of consciousness on how we find meaningful direction for using our talents. Includes the theory and practice of mindfulness and mediation; finding meaning in dreams; the stress-reduction and creativity-enhancement effects of visualization; and traditions of vision-questing about personal meaning and life purpose.

INTS 360: The Built Environment (6 Credits)

Examines, records, and interprets objects, structures, and landscapes that compose our built environment. Draws on the fields of historical archaeology, architectural history, and urban geography, and employs photography, cartography, and evocative writing to represent the material world we inhabit. Builds on study of one neighborhood in Arlington, Virginia, and expands to entire metropolitan area.

INTS 361: Neighborhood, Community, and Identity (3-6 Credits)

Examines processes of neighborhood formation and transformation in the context of urbanism, suburbanism, immigration, and transmigration.

INTS 362: Social Justice and Human Rights (3 Credits)

Considers the philosophical foundations of social justice and human rights. Explores the interpretive difficulties related to identifying what constitutes human rights abuses, and evaluates regional perspectives on human rights. Analyzes institutions that strive to promote and enforce social justice and human rights standards including the United Nations system, regional human rights bodies, and domestic courts.

INTS 365: Independent Study (1-12 Credits)

Individualized section form required. Study of a topic not otherwise available to the student. May involve any combination of reading assignments, tutorials, lectures, papers, presentations, or field/laboratory study (determined in consultation with instructor) Students are encouraged to work as a team on a particular topic.

INTS 370: Sustainable Food Systems (6 Credits)

Examines the evolution of US food systems with particular emphasis on the national capital region.Ê Students place conventionalÊ agriculture and food systems in historical context and research alternative systems that emphasize sustainability. Beyond farm to table,Ê thisÊ course asks students to contemplate how capitalism, industrialization, and environmental ethics shape our land, culture, and society.

INTS 371: Food Systems and Policy (3 Credits)

Examines the roles of individuals, corporations, and government in creating food policy. Students investigate USÊ agriculture, food production and the environment, food andÊ beverage processing, food safety and labeling, food sales and marketing, dietaryÊ guidance, and federal food assistance programs.

INTS 375: Special Topics (1-18 Credits)

Studies topics of special interest to undergraduates.

INTS 378: Medicine, Justice, and Public Policy (3 Credits)

Explores formation of public policy relating to several key issues in medicine. Students examine basic theories of justice and public policy formation and apply these to contemporary issues in the field of medicine. The goal is to examine how current policy on these issues was established and to give examples of major stakeholders in the debate. This course involves some traditional lecture and discussion classes and also features participative learning through group work and web-based discussions.

INTS 381: When Cultural Worlds Collide (6 Credits)

Explores what happens when "civilization" encounters "the jungle" by reading, writing, discussing, and viewing written and filmed works dealing with contacts between cultures with colliding world views. Literature (from Conrad's The Heart of Darkness to Shakespeare's The Tempest to Burrough's Tarzan ), news articles, radio broadcasts, web home pages, art exhibits, and many film and video presentations provide the basis for in-class and out-of-class activities.

INTS 390: Internship (1-6 Credits)

Internship credit may be applied to 12 credits required in experiential learning.

INTS 391: Introduction to Integrative Studies (3 Credits)

Describes key components of the Integrative Studies Program in The School of Integrative Studies. Students prepare for active participation as a community of learners to develop skills in reflective learning and self-assessment, and identify areas of intellectual and professional interests, values and skills so that students may take greater advantage of opportunities in SIS. As a learning community, this course fosters group collaboration, intensive writing, and reflective learning.

INTS 394: Service-Learning Experience (1-15 Credits)

Service-learning courses offer students, faculty, and community partners an opportunity to work together to integrate and apply knowledge to address community needs. Learning goals, action strategies, and assignments developed collaboratively. Students demonstrate progress through critical reflection that illustrates growth in acquiring and comprehending values, skills, and knowledge content. Critical reflection may take the form of papers, presentations, portfolios, journals, and exams.

INTS 395: Field-Based Work (1-18 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

INTS 396: Teaching Assistant Experience (1-6 Credits)

Teaching assistantship and peer-mentoring duties carried out through existing university programs, such as Technology Assistants, Writing Tutors, and Residence Advisors. Also includes teaching assistantship arrangements for specific courses detailed in individualized course contract signed by instructor and student. In addition to peer mentoring/advising, course work may include logistical support, reading assignments, papers, presentations, and portfolios.

INTS 397: Add-On Experiential Learning (1-3 Credits)

For students who wish to add one or more experiential learning credit to existing experiential learning course or learning community.

INTS 398: Field-Based Work (1-15 Credits)

Experiential-based individualized studies, mentored by instructor.

INTS 399: Study Abroad (1-6 Credits)

Intended for participation in formally organized course offered by Center for Global Education.

400-Level Courses in INTS

INTS 400: Temptress: Constructs of Sex and Power (3 Credits)

Examines the portrayal of powerful and/or sexual women throughout history, identifying famous historical "temptresses" and investigating the facts known about them. Explores representations and perceptions of contemporary female sexuality, considering possible future concepts and images of female power and sexuality.

INTS 401: Conservation Biology (6 Credits)

Provides students with a working knowledge of conservation biology. Integrates the study of social, economic, and political factors with biodiversity, population modeling, habitat degradation, and management issues. Students confront the leading edge of this exciting field by developing real species conservation plans. The experiential learning component of the course will include trips to the Smithsonian Institution's Conservation and Research Center in Front Royal, Virginia, to study with nationally known experts. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 402: Plants and People - Sustenance, Ceremony, and Sustainability (6 Credits)

Examines the direct relationships between people and plants by integrating perspectives from both ethnobotany and economic botany. Provides students with an appreciation of the fundamental role of plants and plant-derived products in all aspects of human life in both industrialized and non-industrialized societies. Explores how plants and their uses have shaped both past and present cultures around the world. Designated a Green Leaf Course.

INTS 403: Conservation Behavior (6 Credits)

Introduces students to conservation behavior, a field that seeks to apply theories of animal behavior towards solving biological conservation and wildlife management problems. Consists of interactive lectures, readings (including a text and primary literature) and discussion, and hands-on, inquiry-based experiential learning while working in groups at the National Zoo to design and conduct independent behavioral-based research on endangered species.

INTS 404: Ethics and Leadership (4 Credits)

Uses an interdisciplinary approach to deepen and broaden student's learning about theories, models, and constructs related to the study and practice of ethics and leadership. Teaches students to develop ethical decision making strategies, communicate effectively in diverse group settings, value civic engagement and actively apply ethical leadership skills. Includes experiential learning activities and discussions that connect formal knowledge with real world experiences and includes one credit of experiential learning.

INTS 405: Women and Leadership (4 Credits)

Examines leadership within the context of the theoretical principles of women's studies through discussion of course texts, interactive exercises, field trips, documentary films, guest speakers, and reflection. Investigates the role that gender plays in the various forms of leadership and leadership styles. Explores the historical record of women in leadership roles, identifying the barriers as well as the opportunities.

INTS 410: Contemporary Health Issues (3-18 Credits)

Looks at a variety of health and health care issues. Examines several of the major health concerns of women and, to a lesser degree, men. Also explores the biology and medical implications of these diseases and how our society deals with potential life-altering information. Examines who is making the decisions on the allocation of research funds and prevention of diseases.

INTS 416: Refugee and Internal Displacement (3 Credits)

Provides students with a deeper understanding of refugee and internal displacement. Explores causes of displacement and its impact on people and societies. Studies the role played by governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the international community in addressing problems faced by refugees in internally displaced persons in terms of relief assistance and humanitarian services.

INTS 420: Work Effectiveness Skills (3 Credits)

Develops a variety of work-readiness skills needed to become successful in both local and global marketplaces. Topics and skills covered include communication, problem solving in the business setting, workplace ethics, listening skills, how to influence others, building team project rapport, and meeting effectiveness skills.

INTS 422: An Experiential Approach to American Foreign Policy (3-6 Credits)

Takes an experiential approach to the study of American foreign policy. Through case studies, discussions, group projects, and directed research, students learn how foreign policy is made and executed and how they as citizens, activists, or officials can influence national decisions.

INTS 431: Principles of Fund Raising (4 Credits)

Examines history of philanthropy and public policy, and the economic and legal frameworks that shape it. Combining theory and practice, students study human behavior, communications, and management systems that are hallmarks of successful fund raising, and begin to develop skills to generate donations, foundation grants, and other unearned revenue for a nonprofit organization.

INTS 435: Leadership in a Changing Environment (4 Credits)

Examines diverse definitions and processes of change across multiple complex contexts. Focuses on identifying innovative, collaborative solutions to seemingly intractable social problems. Explores topics such as social change and globalization, creative conflict resolution, the nature of power, oppression and influence, and systemic leadership.

INTS 436: Social Justice Education (4 Credits)

Examines educational policy, practice, and materials using a variety of lenses informed by social justice theory and praxis. Investigates ways in which racism, sexism, economic injustice, heterosexism, ageism, and other forms of discrimination influence schools and educational access and opportunity for youth. Considers and practices what individuals and communities can do to ensure that all students have equitable educational opportunities.

INTS 440: Death, Dying, and Decision Making (3 Credits)

Interdisciplinary examination of clinical care of dying persons along with psychosocial issues related to processes of death and dying. Special emphasis on application of ethical principles in resolving complex problems for individuals with life-threatening illnesses and their families as care givers or decision makers. Students consider the changing norms and mores surrounding end-of-life decisions and explore the care available to terminally ill patients.

INTS 445: Multimedia Design (5 Credits)

Technological, aesthetic, and educational issues of using interactive multimedia. Topics include theory and practice, integration of digital media, interface and navigation studies, and technical constraints on design.

INTS 446: Art, Beauty, and Culture (3-6 Credits)

Designed to help students understand the culture- and time-bound nature of beauty as it relates to art. Exploration of how the codes of acceptability in art forms have changed over time, with discussion about the subversive nature of art and the role that beauty plays in art that is created to engage the viewer in some type of action. Exercises include research projects, site visits, and gallery attendance.

INTS 455: Consciousness and Transformation in Action (3 Credits)

Covers how principles and practices of consciousness and transformation relate to the major and career pathway it represents. Includes the theory and practices for deepening the student's own experience with the mindfulness and contemplative approaches to inquire. Capstone course for the minor in consciousness and transformation.

INTS 465: Independent Study (1-12 Credits)

Individualized section form required. Study of a topic not otherwise available to the student. May involve any combination of reading assignments, tutorials, lectures, papers, presentations, or field/laboratory study (determined in consultation with instructor) Students are encouraged to work as a team on a particular topic.

INTS 470: Professional Pathways in Sustainable Food Systems (1 Credits)

Culminating experience for Environmental and Sustainability Studies majors enrolled in the Sustainable Food and Agriculture concentration. Focused on helping students see how their specific talents, interests and experiences can prepare them for specific professional roles within the emerging field of sustainable food systems.

INTS 475: Special Topics (1-18 Credits)

Studies topics of special interest to undergraduates.

INTS 490: Internship (1-6 Credits)

Internship credit may be applied to 12 credits required in experiential learning.

INTS 491: The Senior Capstone Experience (3 Credits)

Should be taken semester before graduation; 85 credits required. Graduation requirement for integrative studies students. Students complete final SIS portfolio and senior exposition. Provides information on issues of professional development (interviewing skills, resume development, career strategies, and alumni opportunities).

INTS 492: Graduation Portfolio (0 Credits)

INTS 493: Graduation Portfolio (0 Credits)

INTS 494: Service-Learning Experience (1-15 Credits)

Service-learning courses offer students, faculty, and community partners an opportunity to work together to integrate and apply knowledge to address community needs. Learning goals, action strategies, and assignments developed collaboratively. Students demonstrate progress through critical reflection that illustrates growth in acquiring and comprehending values, skills, and knowledge content. Critical reflection may take the form of papers, presentations, portfolios, journals, and exams.

INTS 495: Field-Based Work (1-18 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

INTS 496: Teaching Assistant Experience (1-6 Credits)

Teaching assistantship and peer-mentoring duties carried out through existing university programs, such as technology assistants, writing tutors, and residence advisors. Also includes teaching assistantship arrangements for specific courses detailed in individualized course contract signed by instructor and student. In addition to peer mentoring/advising, course work may include logistical support, reading assignments, papers, presentations, and portfolios.

INTS 497: Add-On Experiential Learning (1-3 Credits)

For students who wish to add one or more experiential learning credit to existing experiential learning course or learning community.

INTS 498: Field-Based Work (1-15 Credits)

Experiential-based individualized studies, mentored by instructor.

Topics in INTS

INTS 375: Special Topics (1-18 Credits)

Studies topics of special interest to undergraduates.

INTS 395: Field-Based Work (1-18 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

INTS 398: Field-Based Work (1-15 Credits)

Experiential-based individualized studies, mentored by instructor.

INTS 475: Special Topics (1-18 Credits)

Studies topics of special interest to undergraduates.

INTS 495: Field-Based Work (1-18 Credits)

Directed field studies in topic not otherwise available to students.

INTS 498: Field-Based Work (1-15 Credits)

Experiential-based individualized studies, mentored by instructor.

Graduate

500-Level Courses in INTS

INTS 500: Animal Rights: Issues and Movements (3 Credits)

Explores forms of animal exploitation and abuse, and examines the relationship between humans and non - human animals, drawing from a variety of disciplines and fields such as feminist studies, animal studies, sociology, ethics, critical studies, and environmental studies. Assessment of the methods and strategies used by organizations and movements in order to redress animal exploitation.

INTS 504: Leadership Theory, Praxis, and Development (3 Credits)

Explores contemporary leadership theories, models, and concepts using a theory-to-practice-to theory framework. Covers leadership theory, supporting research, and practical application.Ê Focuses on active learning through classroom presentations, course texts, a reflection on theory and practice, and team work.

INTS 540: Contemporary Issues in Social Justice & Human Rights (3 Credits)

Students will examine, study the socio-historical significance of, and consider solutions for some of the most pressing social justice and human rights issues in the world today. The issues examined will cut across identity, region, and scope, and may include concerns as varied as human trafficking, hegemony, animal abuse, child labor, and sexism.

INTS 595: Experiential Learning (1-3 Credits)

Topics in INTS

INTS 595: Experiential Learning (1-3 Credits)